Dead Sea
 
 

View of Dead Sea
The Dead Sea is a salt lake bordering Jordan to the east, and Palestine and Israel to the west. Its surface and shores are 427 metres (1,401 ft) below sea level, Earth's lowest elevation on land. The Dead Sea is 306 m (1,004 ft) deep, the deepest hypersaline lake in the world. With 34.2% salinity (in 2011), it is also one of the world's saltiest bodies of water, though Lake Vanda in Antarctica (35%), Lake Assal (Djibouti) (34.8%), Lagoon Garabogazkol in the Caspian Sea (up to 35%) and some hypersaline ponds and lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica (such as Don Juan Pond (44%)) have reported higher salinities. It is 9.6 times as salty as the ocean. This salinity makes for a harsh environment in which animals cannot flourish, hence its name. The Dead Sea is 50 kilometres (31 mi) long and 15 kilometres (9 mi) wide at its widest point. It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River.

The Dead Sea has attracted visitors from around the Mediterranean basin for thousands of years. Biblically, it was a place of refuge for King David. It was one of the world's first health resorts (for Herod the Great), and it has been the supplier of a wide variety of products, from balms for Egyptian mummification to potash for fertilizers. People also use the salt and the minerals from the Dead Sea to create cosmetics and herbal sachets.

Floating on the Dead Sea
The Dead Sea has a rich history – from Biblical writings, to how the Egyptians used the mud in their mummification process – but little has changed since the days of Cleopatra, who lusted after its healing properties and built the world's first ever spa along its shores. It is difficult not to get caught up in its claim for beautification when you're there, and floating, and covered completely in mud.

You actually float in the water without even trying and getting into the water was so surreal. Not only is the dead sea an amazing thing to see but we also were able to visit the Masada fortress nearby which was a great piece of history to learn about. There is mud near the Dead Sea that is known for having exceptional qualities for your skin. I was able to cover my entire body with it.

Natural Dead Sea Body Mud
Body Mud Mask it is 100% Organic Dead Sea Black Mud & Minerals from the Dead Sea In Jordan. The Dead Sea Mud Mask cleanses, moisturizes and removes impurities from the skin leaving it freshly glowing. It Also stimulates blood circulation and it is effective in the treatment of rheumatism, Also It May Reduces The Effects Of Psoriasis, Eczema, And Other Skin Disorders.

Form : Dead Sea wet paste Mud Mask ,Cleaned & Filtered From Impurities ,Stones , Large & Small Particles , Sterilized By Heat and Ready to be used on Body for Spa's & Personal use.

Shore Cave
A cave on the Jordanian shore of the Dead Sea near Zara spring, where splashing waves have left a thick layer of salt crystals and stalactites.

Salt Evaporation Ponds
Salt evaporation ponds, also called salterns or salt pans, are shallow artificial ponds designed to extract salts from sea water or other brines. The seawater or brine is fed into large ponds and water is drawn out through natural evaporation which allows the salt to be subsequently harvested. The ponds also provide a productive resting and feeding ground for many species of waterbirds, which may include endangered species. The ponds are commonly separated by levees.

Due to variable algal concentrations, vivid colors – from pale green to bright red – are created in the evaporation ponds. The color indicates the salinity of the ponds. Microorganisms change their hues as the salinity of the pond increases. In low- to mid-salinity ponds, green algae such as Dunaliella salina are predominant, although these algae can also take on an orange hue. In middle- to high-salinity ponds, Halobacteria, which is actually a group of halophilic Archaea (sometimes called Haloarchaea), shift the colour to pink, red and orange. Other bacteria such as Stichococcus also contribute tints.

Coastal Erosion
Coastal erosion is a natural process along the world's coastlines that occurs through the actions of currents and waves and results in the loss of sediment in some places and accretion in others.

Coastal erosion is the wearing away of land or the removal of beach or dune sediments by wave action, tidal currents, wave currents, or drainage (see also beach evolution). Waves, generated by storms, wind, or fast moving motor craft, cause coastal erosion, which may take the form of long-term losses of sediment and rocks, or merely the temporary redistribution of coastal sediments; erosion in one location may result in accretion nearby. The study of erosion and sediment redistribution is called 'coastal morphodynamics'. It may be caused by hydraulic action, abrasion, and corrosion.

On non-rocky coasts, coastal erosion results in dramatic rock formations in areas where the coastline contains rock layers or fracture zones with varying resistance to erosion. Softer areas become eroded much faster than harder ones, which typically result in landforms such as tunnels, bridges, columns, and pillars.
 

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